Publications

190 Result(s)
Duhaime, G. and A. Godmaire , 2002

Les modèles du développement du Nord. Analyse exploratoire au Québec isolé, Recherches sociographiques, 43(2): 329-351.

Abstract

Dispersées dans tout le Québec non urbanisés, quelque 80 agglomérations dites du « Québec isolé » forment des regroupements ethnogéographiques aux contours flous dont les destins socioéconomiques sont très différents. Cette étude examine les modèles de développement de ces communautés. Elle est fondée sur une analyse comparative détaillée de plusieurs dizaines de variables portant sur la démographie, l'éducation, la santé, le logement, le revenu personnel, les dépenses publiques, les activités économiques. Neuf indicateurs clés sont analysés ici. L'étude montre que ces réalités forment quatre modèles de développement, qui se distinguent principalement suivant le type d'exploitation des ressources naturelles et les caractéristiques de la population. Dans les régions où l'exploitation des ressources est pratiquée à grande échelle, les populations bénéficient des retombées économiques du développement. Mais elles le font selon des modalités différentes, directement parce que les familles en ont fait leur gagne-pain, ou indirectement parce que les populations en cause ont pu capitaliser sur l'attrait des ressources. Dans les régions où l'exploitation des ressources est pratiquée à petite échelle, où la prospérité n'est plus assurée par des mécanismes autrefois efficaces, la situation générale se détériore non seulement parce que l'infrastructure économique demeure faible, mais aussi parce que les populations n'ont pas de poids politique pour qu'il en soit autrement. Dans cette perspective, le facteur ethnique serait un déterminant bien moins important que la présence de richesses massives et la capacité d'en tirer localement partie.

Duhaime, G. and A. Godmaire , 2002

The Conditions of Sustainable Food Security. An Integrated Conceptual Framework, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 15-45

Abstract

Based upon a review of the world literature, this chapter presents an integrated conceptual framework of the conditions of food security. The systemic model provides definitions of the principal variables, as well as explanations and illustrations of their mutual - and most of the time multidimensional - relationships. The fundamental framework is that food security and food insecurity (both being potentially sustainable or not) is the result of the relations between social factors (demography, health), intermediating mechanism (food production and circulation in the market and the non-market spheres), and food consumption determinants (accessibility, availability). The framework is drawn here in order to provide the readers with a tool to situate each of the following chapters into a global context, to provide the analytical tool that will guide the synthesis of this book which is presented in the last chapter

Halley, P. and M. Verreault , 2002

Environmental Law, Sustainable Development and Food Security in Nunavik, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 177-188

Abstract

This chapter discusses a large body of research involving provincial and Federal environmental law within the framework of sustainable development in Nunavik. The objective is to identify the links between environmental protection, economic development, natural resource management, and food security and identify how these links, under Canadian and Quebec law, affect the understanding and resolution of conflict pertaining to sustainable development in the region. A systemic approach is used for the study of sustainable development, in which close attention is paid to the ecological dimensions and their interactions with social and economic variables. Using this perspective, the legal framework for Nunavik is identified, and its effectiveness in ensuring ecosystem viability and stability explored. The results presented in this chapter are preliminary. Finally, our study identifies the politicized nature of research on the legal aspects of sustainable development and prospects tor future research.

Levesque, Carole , 2002

Between Abundance and Scarcity: Food and the Institution of Sharing Among the Inuit of the Circumpolar Region During the Recent Historical Period, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 103-115

Abstract

This chapter outlines factors of change and continuity of food patterns among the Inuit of Northern Quebec. Arguments presented are based on a review of the literature on food acquisition, consumption, and distribution in the circumpolar Arctic over a hundred years. In this period, Inuit food dynamics have evolved along with other important aspects of their social and economic organization. Nutrition-related behaviours and practices have been modified or have disappeared altogether new ones have been integrated, some with success, others creating new problems and constraints. The establishment of trading posts and settlements, and introduction of firearms, and manufactured food products profoundly altered Inuit economics and Inuit ways in this regard, but today's social and food networks are still largely based on a logic and criteria. that were valid a hundred years ago. It is argued that in the Arctic, the basic trends and characteristics of the current Western formal economy are informed and supported in many ways by a continued Inuit rationality.

Melkevik, Bjarne , 2002

The Law and Aboriginal Reindeer Herding in Norway, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 197-203

Abstract

The legal framework of reindeer herding activities of the Sami people of Norway is used to consider food security and legal access to natural resources. A description of how the Sami became 'the reindeer people,' and how herding became their main source of self-identification, sets the stage to analyze how herding activities have changed into an Aboriginal industry. A last section of the paper is devoted to the economic and ecological problems related to reindeer herding. In the final analysis, it is argued that it must be the responsibility of Sami political institutions, the Samiting, to make choices concerning the future of Sami reindeer herding activities in Norway.

Müller-Wille, Ludger , 2002

From Reindeer Stew to Pizza: The Displacement of Local Food Resources in Sapmi, Nothernmost Europe, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 145-150

Abstract

The gradual displacement of endogenous food resources - the reindeer stew - by food items that have exogenous origin and are globally marketed - the pizza -i s discussed by taking the Sami and their subarctic homeland, Sapmi, as an example. First is an examination of how the interrelationship among people, environment, resources, and food production can be linked to population density and carrying capacity in specific ecosystems. Secondly, a summary description of the historical Sami food household, based solely on subarctic fauna and flora resources is provided. Third, the modern process of exogenous food imports is presented by introducing the concepts of distant consumption and de-localization of resources. Finally, these concepts are applied to show the emerging local dependency on external resources and the resulting displacement of local resources with respect to their importance and values, economically and culturally, for Sami society.

Myers, Heather , 2002

The Changing Food Economy in Nunavut: Will Country Food Stores Secure Nunavut's Food Supply?, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 95-101

Abstract

The traditional Inuit food production economy has been influenced by a variety of events and circumstances, including the settlement in communities, the introduction of new hunting technologies and wage employment, the anti sealing lobby, and social policies and changes that have altered hunting and fishing, and sharing patterns. Yet the traditional economy has remained important to Inuit, and the Nunavut government has recognized the value of developing the renewable resource sector. Country food stores may be one way to meet several needs, economic development, provision of affordable and nutritious food, and continuation of Inuit cultural values. There have been several such outlets developed in the Northwest Territories, which have entered local, regional, territorial, national and international markets, some with impressive success. In Nunavut, two examples of country food outlets are examined, from Pond lnlet and Cambridge Bay, along with their philosophy, employment and sales patterns. These outlets and their apparent success, raise some interesting research questions, which are outlined at the end of the paper.

Otis, Ghislain , 2002

Inuit Subsistence Rights Under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement: A Legal Perspective on Food Security in Nunavik, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 189-195

Abstract

This chapter outlines some of the key issues relating to the security of the subsistence rights of the Inuit in Nunavik. It is a part of a broader research question aimed at achieving a better understanding of how food security relates to legal security with regard to access to and use of country-food resources by Aboriginal people. Existing research underscores the importance of subsistence economies in the quest for sustainable development and food security in the Arctic. It also acknowledges the critical role played by Aboriginal land rights regimes in securing access to the land and its renewable resources. This chapter thus ascertains the legal foundations and scope of Inuit subsistence rights in Nunavik under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement. It also briefly examines how these rights interact with other uses of the land and identifies potential insecurity generating features of the Agreements subsistence regime, which will require further analysis. Aspects of the broader legal environment likely to impact on the security of Inuit subsistence rights are also identified and targeted for more in-depth study.

Peters, Evelyn , 2002

Sustainable Development, Food Security and Aboriginal Self-Government in the Circumpolar North, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 205-225

Abstract

This chapter explores the issues of Aboriginal self-government and sustainable development with a particular focus on aspects relevant to food security. The essay develops, describes, and compares self-government initiatives in Canada, Alaska, Greenland and the Scandinavian countries with respect to the management of wildlife and fisheries; environmental assessment and protection; harvester support programs; and, economic development which focuses on commercial production and marketing of country food. Two main principles are employed to compare these arrangements, their support for indigenous cultures, and the degree to which they provide Aboriginal people with real ability to make decisions or to influence decision-making processes. The analysis shows that self-government arrangements in the circumpolar region vary both within and between countries. While none of the arrangements provide Aboriginal people with jurisdiction over their territory, some do create co-management regimes and advisory structures which provide for the inclusion of Aboriginal concerns in the policy-making process. At the same time, the challenge of integrating Aboriginal decision-making systems, knowledge, and values into structures of governance, which reflect western cultures and which rely on western science, has not been explicitly addressed in any of these arrangements. In all of the areas examined, there are continuing questions about resolving conflicts between development and the protection of subsistence economies.

Rasmussen, Rasmus Ole , 2002

Food Consumption Patterns and Local Markets in the Arctic, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 117-143

Abstract

In many parts of the Arctic, imported low quality foods seem to have replaced high quality locally produced food. In the case of Greenland, however, another situation is dominating. Here, local informal markets, in existence for a very long time, not only continue to play an important role in the local economy, but also caused the local agenda to be directed to the commercial sector. The issue examined in this paper is the evolution of food markets in Greenland, and the relationship between imported and locally produced food. A major question is how consumer behaviour is reflected in consumption patterns. The study begins with an exploration of how the issue has been treated in the literature. Next is an analysis of the food supply situation in Greenland by means of different statistics sources, with special emphasis on the connection between the formal and the informal sectors in relation to food production and consumption. The main purpose of the paper is to arrive at a general understanding of the problems of market economies in remote regions, and of the dynamics between the commercial and the non-commercial markets in relation to food supply and food consumption patterns. One major conclusion of the study is that the informal market drives the local agenda and consumers' preferences are visible in economies characterized by monopolies, enabling local products to be maintained as important food items.

Winther, G. and G. Duhaime , 2002

Cooperatives Societies in Greenland and Nunavik. A Lesson of the Importance of Supporting Structures, Journal of Rural Cooperation, 30 (1): 25-41.

Abstract

We present different types of cooperatives in Greenland and Nunavik, Canada, in order to assess two different developments. A first approach to comparisons leads to an anomaly suggesting the necessity of empirical analysis in the two regions. Why is it that Greenland never really managed to create a cooperative movement? Except for consumer cooperatives, the remaining types of supply and worker cooperatives were a failure. There were isolated success stories for a limited period of time, but the general picture remains the same. Most of these cooperatives are liquidated, and we never saw multi-purpose cooperatives established. Quite the contrary took place in Nunavik, in the northern part of Québec in Canada. Here we saw a viable cooperative movement, and everywhere local communities established multipurpose cooperatives. At the same time a strong cooperative association evolved. It seems that cooperative supporting structures are essential to a cooperative success in an Arctic region.

Chabot, Marcelle , 2001

De la production domestique au marché: l'économie contemporaine des familles inuit du Nunavik, Ph.D., Département de sociologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 503p.

Abstract

Cette étude s'intéresse aux transformations récentes des pratiques économiques des ménages inuit. Les comportements de consommation de ces derniers sont examinés dans le but de comprendre la rationalité qui fonde leurs actions. L'étude repose sur une estimation et une caractérisation de leurs transactions monétaires et non monétaires annuelles, dont les données sont tirées d'une enquête originale réalisée en 1995 auprès d'un échantillon de 47 ménages dans deux villages du Nunavik (Québec, Canada). L'analyse montre que l'économie vivrière conserve une place significative au plan social, culturel et économique, bien que la rnarchandisation de la vie quotidienne et la monétisation des ressources caractérisent aussi l'économie de ces ménages. De plus, les Inuit sont économiquement rationnels et appliquent couramment le calcul monétaire. Cependant les valeurs et normes traditionnelles influencent largement leurs pratiques de consommation. L'analyse permet de conclure que la société contemporaine au Nunavik, bien qu'elle participe au marché, ne peut être assimilée à la culture de consommation.

Duhaime, G., N. Bernard and A. Godmaire , 2001

La sédentarisation des autochtones, dans: Le Nord: habitants et mutations, Atlas historique du Québec, Sainte-Foy, Presses de l'Université Laval, pp. 173-193

Abstract not available
Duhaime, G., A. Morin, H. Myers and D. St-Pierre , 2001

Inuit Business Ownership. Canadian Experiences, Greenland Challenge, Arctic Research Journal, (1): 193-212.

Abstract not available
Martin, Thibault , 2001

Solidarités et intégration communautaire. Le projet Grande-Baleine et le relogement des Inuit de Kuujjuarapik à Umiujaq, Ph.D., Département de sociologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 575p.

Abstract

En 1986, un tiers de la population inuit du village de Kuujjuarapik (Nunavik) déménageait pour aller fonder le nouveau village d'Umiujaq. Dans cette thèse nous cherchons à comprendre comment une agrégation d'individu peut se transformer en une communauté intégrée. Pour répondre à cette question nous nous intéressons plus particulièrement au rôle joué par les solidarités dans l'intégration communautaire. L'hypothèse à la base de la thèse est qu'au lieu d'être antinomiques les deux formes de solidarités, telles que définies par la sociologie classique, réciprocité d'une part et solidarité associative d'autre part se complètent. L'analyse développée dans cette thèse suggère que l'existence de deux sources distinctes de solidarité permet à l'acteur social d'exercer un accès réflexif aux différentes sources de solidarité, ce qui favorise son intégration en tant qu'individu autonome au sein de la communauté. Par contre, le dysfonctionnement de l'une ou l'autre des solidarités ou l'incapacité du sujet d'avoir un accès réflexif aux solidarités a pour conséquence d'empêcher celui-ci de s'inscrire comme individu autonome dans la communauté.

Morin, Alexandre , 2001

Rationalité et lien social chez les dirigeants d'entreprise du Groenland: modernité, néo-libéralisme et capitalisme, M.A., Département de sociologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 161p.

Abstract

Ce mémoire porte sur la rationalité des dirigeants d'entreprise du Groenland. L'analyse est basée sur des entrevues effectuées auprès des acteurs de l'industrie alimentaire. Les valeurs préconisées dans le discours dominant révèlent une idéologie capitaliste et néo-libérale. Entre autres, l'intervention de l'État dans l'économie est vue comme un obstacle au développement économique, tant chez les dirigeants d'entreprise du secteur gouvernemental que privé. Il en découle un lien social typiquement moderne, compte tenu que les actions des individus sont motivées rationnellement vers une quête de rentabilité qui importe avant toute chose. Ainsi, la social-démocratie (nivellement des conditions de vie par l'État) et certaines valeurs traditionnelles (nourriture inuite de l'époque nomade) sont moins considérées, car elles ne favorisent pas la profitabilité. Cette logique d'action résulte de transformations sociohistoriques données, où la pénétration du capitalisme dans les rapports sociaux a modernisé le Groenland depuis sa colonisation par les Danois.

St-Pierre, Dominique , 2001

Hermes et Sila. Le fonctionnement de l'échange alimentaire sur la Côte nord du Labrador, M.A., Département de sociologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 141p.

Abstract

Le présent mémoire décrit l'articulation entre le système de l'échange par le don et le système d'échange marchand capitaliste au sein d'une société donnée. Le cas à l'étude est celui de l'échange alimentaire sur la Côte nord du Labrador. À l'aide de techniques d'enquêtes par entrevues semi-dirigées et par questionnaires, les données furent recueillies dans deux communautés de la région à l'étude. L'analyse des résultats permet de voir que diverses formes d'échange alimentaire (don, troc, emprunt, prêt, achat, vente) utilisent des réseaux sociaux variés de manière complémentaire. La complémentarité du don et de l'échange marchand capitaliste existe lorsque les individus ont les moyens, financiers ou sociaux, d'utiliser les deux systèmes; sinon il y a exclusion d'un des systèmes. En cas d'exclusion d'un système d'échange alimentaire, l'autre système permet à l'individu exclu de maintenir un approvisionnement. Le recours à l'un ou l'autre système alternativement, ou aux deux systèmes simultanément, assurerait la survie individuelle et la cohésion sociale.

Statistique Canada , 2001

Questionnaire Aboriginal Peoples Survey and Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic 2001, Ottawa, Statistique Canada.

Abstract not available
Statistique Canada , 2001

Questionnaire de l'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001, Ottawa, Statistique Canada., Questionnaire de l'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001, Ottawa, Statistique Canada.

Abstract not available
Duhaime, G., P. Fréchette and V. Robichaud , 1999

The Economic Structure of the Nunavik region (Canada). Changes and Stability, Canada research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition, Université Laval, Québec, 9 p. + appendices

Abstract not available
Tremblay, Jean-François , 1999

Analyse structurale des relations entre les acteurs: Le cas des Atikamekw, des Montagnais et des gouvernements, Ph.D., Département de science politique, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 351p.

Abstract

Cette thèse s'intéresse aux questions relatives à l'autonomie gouvernementale en milieu autochtone sous l'angle d'une tentative originale de négociation ; soit celle concernant les nations atikamekw et montagnaise entre 1975 et 1995. Son objectif est de décrire, d'analyser et d'expliquer, à l'aide d'une approche structurale, les changements survenus dans les relations de pouvoir entre les acteurs autochtones et gouvernementaux durant cette période. La recherche accorde une attention toute particulière au rôle joué par le Conseil des Atikamekwet des Montagnais ( CM ) . Elle tente d'observer la position de pouvoir de cet organisme entre 1975 et 1995 et de juger de la nature des relations qu'il a su entretenir avec, d'un côté, les 12 communaurés qu'il représentait et, de l'autre, les gouvernements avec lesquels il négociait. En dernier lieu, la recherche aboutit à la présentation de facteurs explicatifs des problèmes qui ont mené à la dissolution du CAM.

Duhaime, G., P. Fréchette and V. Robichaud , 1998

The 1991 Social Accounting Matrix for the Nunavik Regional Economy, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition, Université Laval, Québec, 5 p. + appendices

Abstract not available