Publications

Bernard, Nick (under the dir. of G. Duhaime), 2006

Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2006, Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 79p.

Résumé The Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2006 compares the prices of 199 food products, 24 household products, 16 personal care products, 14 commonly used models of snowmobiles, and certain essential hunting and fishing equipment (including gasoline), not to mention monthly housing costs. The study was carried out by the Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition at the Université Laval. Data collection in Nunavik was completed by local employment officers of the Kativik Regional Government in the communities of Kuujjuaq, Salluit and Inukjuak based on the method developed for the Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2000. This method involves the use and adaptation of national socio-economic indicators as well as the goods, products and services list used by Statistics Canada to produce The Consumer Price Index. This method makes it possible to measure differences in prices between Nunavik and the Quebec City area. The Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2006 demonstrates that a majority of the products and services compared under the study are, on average and to varying degrees, more expensive in Nunavik. In particular, food products are, on average, 57% more expensive than in the Quebec City area.

Bernard, Nick (under the dir. of G. Duhaime), 2006

Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2006 - Complementary study Magdalen Islands, Northern Québec, Lower North Shore, Abridged version, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 34p.

Résumé This complementary study under the Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2006 compares the prices of 148 food products, 17 household products, 15 personal care products, 14 models of snowmobile, regular unleaded gasoline and certain hunting and fishing equipment in Nunavik and the Quebec City area with prices in three other regions of Québec: the Magdalen Islands, the James Bay area and the Lower North Shore. The data collected under the Nunavik Comparative Price Index 2006 were compared with prices gathered in Cap-aux-Meules, Matagami and La Romaine. The data collected are based on national socio-economic indicators as well as the goods, products and services list used by Statistics Canada to produce The Consumer Price Index. This method makes it possible to measure differences in prices of items sold in Nunavik, the Quebec City area and the three other regions contemplated under the complementary study. The results of the complementary study demonstrate that all the products compared are, on average and to varying degrees, more expensive in Nunavik than in the other regions contemplated under the study.

Duhaime, Gérard (sous la dir.), 2006

Les aînés du Nunavik ont de faibles revenus, Nunivaat, Bulletin statistique du Nunavik, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 1F-Décembre 2006.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard (sous la dir.), 2006

Les Nunavimmiut payent plus cher pour les biens de consommation courante, Nunivaat, Bulletin statistique du Nunavik, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 2F-Décembre 2006.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard (under the dir.), 2006

Low Incomes for Nunavik Elders, Nunivaat, Nunavik Statistical Bulletin, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal People, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 1E-December 2006.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard (under the dir.), 2006

Nunavimmiut Pay More for Staple Consumer Goods, Nunivaat, Nunavik Statistical Bulletin, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal People, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 2E-December 2006.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, G. et A. Caron, 2006

The Economy of the Circumpolar Arctic, in Solveig Glomsrod and Iulie Aslaksen (eds.), The Economy of the North, Oslo, Statistics Norway, chapter 2, pp 17-23

Résumé non disponible

Shadian, Jessica, 2006

Reconceptualizing Sovereignty Through Indigenous Autonomy: A Case Study of Arctic Governance and the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, Ph.D., Faculty of Political Science and International Relations, University of Delaware, United-States, 465p.

Résumé This dissertation examines the role of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference (ICC) as a case study for the ways in which non-state actors are changing previous conceptions of sovereignty in the study of International Relations. This dissertation explores the ways in which sovereignty, as demarcated by a territorially bounded state, is becoming only one dimension of a new locus of sovereignty. Legitimate sovereignty has been transferred from the sole discretion of the state to the domain of existing non-state and emerging institutions. As an institution, the ICC has attained both Arctic domestic and international power and influence. Yet, its legitimacy is derived through an ongoing historical narrative of what it means to be 'indigenous' and 'Inuit' within international politics. The dissertation focuses on three different yet overlapping levels of analysis. Specifically, these levels are (1) the domestic-Inuit political identity construction in Canada, Greenland, and Alaska; (2) the Arctic regional-the ICC in relation to the Arctic Council and; (3) the international-UN, international legal discourse. The ICC has attained legitimacy in a changing global system by espousing a certain discourse based on a narrative of the collective history of the Inuit-the myth of the 'Arctic Inuit.' This myth, culminating with the Inuit as an Arctic indigenous transnational polity, has attained its authority and legitimacy through direct institutional ties to emerging international human rights discourse. The point is to illustrate how, in traversing all these levels of authority, the ICC has managed to make Inuit self-determination part of the very definition of sustainable development (Inuit stewardship over the Arctic); establish sustainable development as the dominant discourse of the Arctic; and ensure that sustainable development falls squarely under the broader issue of international human rights. In essence, this case study of the ICC demonstrates that, for 'the Inuit,' sovereignty is exercised not through their ability to achieve statehood or as an NGO or intergovernmental institution, but through the legitimacy of their myth-or collective history within the realm of global politics- providing one example of the constitutive relationship between non-state institutions and the making of global agendas.

Statistique Canada, 2006

Activités de récolte et bien-être de la collectivité parmi les Inuits dans l'Arctique canadien: constatations préliminaires de l'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001 - Enquête sur les conditions de vie dans l'Arctique, Ottawa, Statisitique Canada, catalogue no. 89-619-XIF, 28p.

Résumé Nous présentons dans le présent rapport quelques constatations initiales de l'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones (EAPA) de 2001 concernant les Inuits qui vivent dans l'Arctique canadien. Aux fins du présent article, la population inuite comprend les personnes qui se sont déclarées inuites dans l'EAPA. L'« Arctique » s'entend de l'ensemble des 53 collectivités énumérées à la section « Qualité des données, concepts et méthodologie - Liste des collectivités comptant une forte population inuite qui ont participé à l'EAPA de 2001 ». La plupart des renseignements présentés ici portent sur les adultes, c'est-à-dire les personnes âgées de 15 ans et plus. Nous donnons parfois certains renseignements sur les enfants inuits âgés de moins de 15 ans.

Statistique Canada, 2006

Harvesting and Community Well-Being Among Inuit in the Canadian Arctic: Preliminary Findings from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey-Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic, Ottawa, Statistics Canada, Catalogue no 89-619-XIE, 25p.

Résumé In this report, some initial findings from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) concerning Inuit living in the Canadian Arctic are presented. For the purposes of this article, the Inuit population consists of those who identified as Inuit on the APS. 'Arctic' refers to the aggregate of the 53 communities identified in "Data quality, concepts and methodology - List of communities with large Inuit populations participating in the 2001 APS" section. Most of the information presented here is on adults, that is, those aged 15 and over. Brief mention is also made of some information related to Inuit children less than 15 years of age.
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